Mission Lab

Scripture on ordination

September 24th, 2019 / By: Texan Staff / comments

Scripture on ordination

2 Timothy 2:15
Do your best to present yourself to God as one approved, a worker who has no need to be ashamed, rightly handling the word of truth.
This passage stresses the need for preparation, spiritually and otherwise. The approval of God, relative to the task, is the basic element of being set apart.

1 Timothy 5:22
Do not be hasty in the laying on of hands, nor take part in the sins of others; keep yourself pure.
Here Paul emphasizes deliberation before setting apart someone for ministry.

Acts 14:23
And when they had appointed elders for them in every church, with prayer and fasting they committed them to the Lord in whom they had believed.
Here is a model for the way we think of ministry ordination, committing them to the Lord.

Acts 6:3
Therefore, brothers, pick out from among you seven men of good repute, full of the Spirit and of wisdom, whom we will appoint to this duty.
We commonly think of this verse as the foundation for deacon ordination. Notice the role of the congregation in this.

Hebrews 13:7
Remember your leaders, those who spoke to you the word of God. Consider the outcome of their way of life, and imitate their faith.
Although this is an admonition to observe the positive example of their leaders, it also sounds like a general call to discern the integrity of a leader’s ministry by the way they live.

1 Timothy 3:1-7
The saying is trustworthy: If anyone aspires to the office of overseer, he desires a noble task. Therefore an overseer must be above reproach, the husband of one wife, sober-minded, self-controlled, respectable, hospitable, able to teach, not a drunkard, not violent but gentle, not quarrelsome, not a lover of money. He must manage his own household well, with all dignity keeping his children submissive, for if someone does not know how to manage his own household, how will he care for God’s church? ...
This is the go-to passage for qualifications for a pastor. Paul stresses high standards in all aspects of a spiritual leader’s life—again, observed by those with whom he worships.

Revelation 2:2
I know your works, your toil and your patient endurance, and how you cannot bear with those who are evil, but have tested those who call themselves apostles and are not, and found them to be false.
The Ephesian church is praised for testing (by the Scriptures) the message and lives of those who claim to be spiritual leaders.

1 Peter 5:5
Likewise, you who are younger, be subject to the elders. Clothe yourselves, all of you, with humility toward one another, for “God opposes the proud but gives grace to the humble.”
“Elder” in this case refers to maturity rather than a role but the usual pattern for examination of a ministry candidate
is that the ordainers are more experienced and the ordained is new to vocational ministry.

James 3:1
Not many of you should become teachers, my brothers, for you know that we who teach will be judged with greater strictness.
With a high calling comes high accountability. One purpose of examining a ministry candidate is to protect him and his hearers from  false teaching and foolish talk.